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All the buzz!!!

1. BUSY BEES

Almost 90% of wild plants and 75% of leading global crops depend on animal pollination.1 One out of every three mouthfuls of our food depends on pollinators. Crops that depend on pollination are five times more valuable than those that do not.

2. HONEY I’M HOME!

Bees can be found living in so many locations, some surprising. Let’s list a few…marshes, swamps, sand dunes, trees, cliffs, prairies wetlands, grasslands, quarries, gravel pits, sea walls, walls of old buildings..

3. BRINGING A BEE BACK TO LIFE

If you find a bumblebee which appears to be struggling, it may be that it is just resting or cold, particularly if the bee is a queen in early spring. If you think the bee is struggling the best thing to do is gently put the bee onto a bee-friendly flower. 

 

If there are no bee-friendly flowers around, mix 50/50 white sugar and water to give the bumblebee a one-off energy boost, providing the carbohydrates it needs to fly. Simply offer a drop or two of sugar water up to the front end of the bee on a teaspoon or an upturned drinks cap in a sheltered place and allow the bee time to recuperate.  

 

(It is not advisable to use brown sugar as it is harder for bees to digest and don’t give bumblebees honey as this can contain pathogens.) 

4.  ANYONE, INCLUDING YOU, CAN HELP A BEE OUT

We can all do our bit to help bees whether that’s in our gardens, balconies or windowsills. You can also chat to friends and family about how cool bees are and help them to make their wild spaces bee-friendly. 

 

Plant a range of flowers in your garden so bees have access to nectar from March to October. Bees love traditional landscape garden flowers and native wildflowers....and PLEASE leave the dandilions alone....they are often the ONLY source of food at the start of spring.

5. BEE GEES

Honeybees have a dance move called the ‘waggle dance’. It’s not actually a dance move at all, rather a clever way of communicating between themselves to tell their nestmates where to go to find the best source of food. It took the researchers at Sussex University two years to decode the waggle dance.

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